RSS

Tag Archives: autism spectrum disorders

Who Teaches NTs about #Autism? C.H.A.S.E.

Who Teaches NTs about #Autism? C.H.A.S.E.

The news? Autism Speaks? A random website? A friend of a friend?

C.H.A.S.E. can.

Community Help for Autism Spectrum Everywhere (C.H.A.S.E.) is a non-profit, grassroots organization founded by parents of an autistic child. The main initiative of C.H.A.S.E. is to promote autism awareness to neurotypical students and community members through education. This collaborative effort utilizes community partnerships and professional expertise to create unique approaches for autism awareness education.

Currently, autism organizations, medical professionals and the education system focuses on the autistic child and how to help them achieve their maximum potential. They do not take into account the neurotypical person, or student, who must interact daily with their autistic peer. People not on the autism spectrum can experience a wide range of emotions regarding their autistic classmates. From confusion to fear, the neurotypical student may have many questions and concerns.

C.H.A.S.E. assists students, teachers, schools and community organizations by building awareness through education. This type of awareness can help students understand the diversity of autism and reduce negative outcomes such as bullying and seclusion. Through education and building awareness, the autistic child is more easily accepted and the neurotypical student is enriched as well.

C.H.A.S.E. has partnered with an elementary school in Overland Park, Kansas to provide education and supports for classrooms
impacted by the unique needs of students with autism. We envision communities that value the diversity of
individuals with autism. What is our plan? C.H.A.S.E. has asked asked for school families who are willing to be identified as having autism and families willing to receive special advocacy training.

Last year, C.H.A.S.E. helped significantly reduce peer conflicts for one boy, after whom C.H.A.S.E. is named. A school counselor delivered a presentation prepared by C.H.A.S.E. explaining autism to his classmates. Several of these lessons helped develop an understanding of what Chase did and why. But, more importantly, peers learned how to help him.

Advertisements
 
Leave a comment

Posted by on September 28, 2014 in Uncategorized

 

Tags: , , , , , , ,

Parenting an Aspie: A Cerebral Task

What if I were to tell you that parenting a child with Asperger’s Disorder is (as not-so-simple as) having an argument without emotion? Perspective and patience, neither of which are plentiful for Aspies or for participants in an argument, are the keys to success.

Let’s face it. An argument takes on a life of its own. It is a verbal joust without rules, order, or logic. At their worst, arguments can be about “winning”, putting others down, and getting revenge. At their best, negative emotion fuels negative emotion as the initial trigger for the argument is shoved aside by anger, frustration, and impatience.

What happens when you replace the word argument with debate? The emotionality of the interaction is completely drained and replaced with rules and structure. A podium allows for uninterrupted speech. A topic is provided beforehand, affording each side time to construct their thoughts into cogent arguments and counterarguments. Emotion is for emphasis but is not necessarily effective or desired.

Let’s take a mom and an Aspie. Our Aspie has failed to brush her teeth after four reminders because the latest installment of Pokemon is far more interesting. Our mom has a long day ahead of her and little sleep and just needs our Aspie to brush her teeth, so they can leave for school.

Brush your teeth.

BRUSH your teeth.

BRUSH YOUR teeth.

BRUSH YOUR TEETH.

When this shift occurs, from problem-solving, from logical, practical thinking, to emotionally laden speech, we lose our Aspie. We bombard her/him with tone of voice, facial expressions, postures, emotive language, and gestures that simply

Shut

An

Aspie

Down.

Brushing anything is farthest from our Aspie’s mind as she tries to make sense of the emotion. Her mind whizzes, she panics, and she has no idea what to do. As she tries to make sense of the emotion, her mom continues to expect that task to be completed. A full-on argument ensues, and our Aspie’s ability to problem-solve, to think rationally – a typical cognitive strength for Aspies – is replaced with a Flight or Flight reaction (depending on the day).

When the dust settles, and the teeth are brushed, our Aspie cannot be left to pick up the pieces, attempting to understand both the problem and the emotion. We need to have a conversation with her, asking her: How can we avoid this next time? How can I communicate better?

Parenting an Aspie is a cerebral task, a constant one at that. By no means am I saying you can parent a neurotypical child easily or mindlessly but they can make sense and learn from your emotions. Your Aspie cannot. You will parent an NT with your gut and an Aspie with your brain. Your Aspie needs you calm, logical, and with your emotions in check.

 

 
10 Comments

Posted by on February 3, 2012 in ASD in the Grand Scheme

 

Tags: , , , ,

An Obit: Asperger’s Disorder (1994-2013)

An Obit: Asperger’s Disorder (1994-2013)

Asperger’s Disorder, a lovable, socially awkward and at times misunderstood part of the autism spectrum, died in May 2013 due to complications related to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition. Asperger’s endured a prolonged battle with ivory-tower hypocrisy and finally succumbed to the paranoid fears of misdiagnosis-motivated endemics and the resultant raging cost of medical expenses. Asperger’s Disorder, known by aliases Asperger Syndrome or Asperger’s, was 19.

Asperger’s Disorder was surrounded by his family, including his brother, Autistic Disorder. 

A beloved icon to some and a controversial figure to others, Asperger’s had deep roots in the most powerful, creative and brilliant minds of our society. With spots in many popular television shows, Asperger’s became the official poster-child for the autism spectrum family.

From 1994 to 2013, Asperger’s was alleged to be responsible for spearheading a dramatic increase in autism spectrum disorders. While naysayers argued that Asperger’s was PC for “freak” or a bail-out for the “weirdo quirky” ones, Aspies clung to their diagnosis with pride and conviction.

Asperger’s is survived by Autistic Disorder, Autism Spectrum Disorder, Sensory Integration Disorder, Childhood Disintegrative Disorder, and Temper Dysregulation Disorder. Asperger’s had recently celebrated graduation from high school and was pursuing courses at the local community college while living at home. Although he aspired to attend the local major university, he knew had many adaptive skills to gain, including juggling a part-time job and maintaining his personal hygiene.

Memorials will be held at upcoming Star Wars conventions, technology summits, E3, LegoLand, Comic Con, LARP gatherings at local colleges, and Magic, YuGiOh, and Pokemon gaming rooms in coffee shops.

 
8 Comments

Posted by on January 30, 2012 in ASD in the Grand Scheme

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , ,

 
%d bloggers like this: