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Tag Archives: autism spectrum disorder

Who Teaches NTs about #Autism? C.H.A.S.E.

Who Teaches NTs about #Autism? C.H.A.S.E.

The news? Autism Speaks? A random website? A friend of a friend?

C.H.A.S.E. can.

Community Help for Autism Spectrum Everywhere (C.H.A.S.E.) is a non-profit, grassroots organization founded by parents of an autistic child. The main initiative of C.H.A.S.E. is to promote autism awareness to neurotypical students and community members through education. This collaborative effort utilizes community partnerships and professional expertise to create unique approaches for autism awareness education.

Currently, autism organizations, medical professionals and the education system focuses on the autistic child and how to help them achieve their maximum potential. They do not take into account the neurotypical person, or student, who must interact daily with their autistic peer. People not on the autism spectrum can experience a wide range of emotions regarding their autistic classmates. From confusion to fear, the neurotypical student may have many questions and concerns.

C.H.A.S.E. assists students, teachers, schools and community organizations by building awareness through education. This type of awareness can help students understand the diversity of autism and reduce negative outcomes such as bullying and seclusion. Through education and building awareness, the autistic child is more easily accepted and the neurotypical student is enriched as well.

C.H.A.S.E. has partnered with an elementary school in Overland Park, Kansas to provide education and supports for classrooms
impacted by the unique needs of students with autism. We envision communities that value the diversity of
individuals with autism. What is our plan? C.H.A.S.E. has asked asked for school families who are willing to be identified as having autism and families willing to receive special advocacy training.

Last year, C.H.A.S.E. helped significantly reduce peer conflicts for one boy, after whom C.H.A.S.E. is named. A school counselor delivered a presentation prepared by C.H.A.S.E. explaining autism to his classmates. Several of these lessons helped develop an understanding of what Chase did and why. But, more importantly, peers learned how to help him.

 
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Posted by on September 28, 2014 in Uncategorized

 

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An Obit: Asperger’s Disorder (1994-2013)

An Obit: Asperger’s Disorder (1994-2013)

Asperger’s Disorder, a lovable, socially awkward and at times misunderstood part of the autism spectrum, died in May 2013 due to complications related to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition. Asperger’s endured a prolonged battle with ivory-tower hypocrisy and finally succumbed to the paranoid fears of misdiagnosis-motivated endemics and the resultant raging cost of medical expenses. Asperger’s Disorder, known by aliases Asperger Syndrome or Asperger’s, was 19.

Asperger’s Disorder was surrounded by his family, including his brother, Autistic Disorder. 

A beloved icon to some and a controversial figure to others, Asperger’s had deep roots in the most powerful, creative and brilliant minds of our society. With spots in many popular television shows, Asperger’s became the official poster-child for the autism spectrum family.

From 1994 to 2013, Asperger’s was alleged to be responsible for spearheading a dramatic increase in autism spectrum disorders. While naysayers argued that Asperger’s was PC for “freak” or a bail-out for the “weirdo quirky” ones, Aspies clung to their diagnosis with pride and conviction.

Asperger’s is survived by Autistic Disorder, Autism Spectrum Disorder, Sensory Integration Disorder, Childhood Disintegrative Disorder, and Temper Dysregulation Disorder. Asperger’s had recently celebrated graduation from high school and was pursuing courses at the local community college while living at home. Although he aspired to attend the local major university, he knew had many adaptive skills to gain, including juggling a part-time job and maintaining his personal hygiene.

Memorials will be held at upcoming Star Wars conventions, technology summits, E3, LegoLand, Comic Con, LARP gatherings at local colleges, and Magic, YuGiOh, and Pokemon gaming rooms in coffee shops.

 
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Posted by on January 30, 2012 in ASD in the Grand Scheme

 

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How Do We Put the Spotlight on ASD?

How do you teach someone about something that they don’t know about? If you are considering moving on to a different post or different page because of the lack of clarity of that statement, be warned that it is purposefully vague. A few days ago, I asked people to provide me blog topics because I was in a bit of a creative funk. Following my earlier post about my exchange with the Internet guy, a parent asked me to blog about how in the world we explain autism to people who know nothing about it. I’ve been thinking about that topic for quite some time, trying to decide how to think about and how to approach such a topic.

Think about a bookstore. There are hundreds of sections and sub-sections. Photography. Test prep. History. Crosswords. Literature. Children’s literature. Black history. Civil war. Nature. Cooking. Dieting. Self-help. What section do you frequent? I recently began exploring to the photography section, as I have purchased a DSLR and am learning the craft slowly but surely. I noticed the section before, but I never picked up a book, flipped through its pages, or considered learning. Was I interested? Maybe from a pure state of curiosity. Did I need to look in that section? Nope. Didn’t own a camera. What’s more, it’s a complicated endeavor. As a matter of fact, everything is a complicated endeavor with pages and pages of information read on topics both large and small. ASD is no different — a huge topic, with millions of voices, and a lot to learn. So, what tips the scales in the direction of wanting to know more?

Quite frankly I believe it is need. A teacher has a student with AS placed in her classroom. A camp counselor has a camper with autism in his camp group. A parent has a child diagnosed with ASD. Suddenly, this unknown entity becomes pertinent enough to warrant, even necessitate exploration and fact-gathering. Recently, I was asked to serve as an expert witness for a case in which an adult with AS was hit by a train. The lawyer said it best: “I’d heard of it but never thought much about it until now.” So, how do we make ASD not just visible with a puzzle piece but visible with a significant impact that warrants explanation?

 
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Posted by on September 10, 2011 in ASD in the Grand Scheme

 

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Words with Friends…and Asperger’s Disorder

We are two weeks plus into the school year and the honeymoon phase is about over for most of my clients. They’ve made the transition, mostly without incident but not without anxiety and struggle, until this week. The emails and phone calls have started to trickle in with small blips that have sent them to the principal’s office, to the buddy room, to the safe seat. The recurring problem area this year relates to language, specifically what others deem “violent” language, both verbal and nonverbal. “I’m going to kill you”. A fake gun out of three fingers to one’s head. “Shut up or else.”

I know, and Tony Attwood has documented, that individuals with AS tend to use graphic language. Blood, guts, boogers, vomit. I think it relates to their visual strengths, as these words intensify their (and the listener’s) ability to imagine what is happening. NTs use these words for effect, for emphasis, for attention, purposes that are variations on the theme of storytelling.

Aspies use these words initially as echolalia. A video game, a movie, a peer, a parent, a sibling utters “I’m gonna kill you if you…” and the phrase resonates, perhaps with a special interest (i.e. video games, Civil War, combat, guns, the human body), perhaps because of how the words themselves sound, and perhaps due to its efficiency at producing a response. “I’m gonna kill you” immediately can mean so much — “whoa! back off” or “he means business, I better take him seriously” or “this could be dangerous”.

After the initial repetition comes the trial period. We’ve moved past novelty into the world of “Man, this really works.” The complicating factor is not knowing why it works, only seeing the end result. If someone is bullying you relentlessly and suddenly rolling around on the floor while mooing like a cow is an effective strategy, you’re likely not going to stop to analyze the rationale for its effectiveness. Well, not initially, and — what’s more — you have the power to process all of the core elements of a situation (social, nonsocial stimuli) that enable your social and environmental understanding. Our Aspies are not always so endowed. We roll and moo, they turn a phrase, it’s all the same: Mission accomplished. But, we all know it’s not that simple. The fallout indicates that the weight of the words is more than Aspies could ever fathom.

Case in point. I received a call yesterday from a local school with some of my favorite staff in the area. As the story goes, my client was unhappy with the topic of conversation in history class and used a piece of wire he found on the ground to make a pretend gun to pretend shoot at his classmate. He tells it very similarly. So, we have the same basic plot with the same basic ending, but the nuances and the subtle themes that provide the meaning to our story are far less developed. When I asked him “why” this mattered so much, his response was, “It’s mean.” Well, yes. Putting a gun to someone’s head is a mean gesture, but why? “Because I might kill her? But I wouldn’t. I won’t. I’d never.” Interestingly, another group member (who has struggled with this issue himself) said, “But they don’t know that. Our conditions make us vulnerable.”

We could say case closed on this page — the boys recognize that their words carry meaning due to the fear of a threat, due to the possibility of follow through, due to what another group member cynically called “paranoia”. The boys recognize the unfortunate life lesson that Asperger’s, and other “conditions”, bring stigma, judgment, and suspicion. But, I wouldn’t be satisfied with that rendition. It would be like Twilight without Full Moon, Harry Potter without the Deathly Hallows, War without the Peace. It’s not as though they emerge from the womb toting guns, talking like sailors, and ready to take no prisoners. On the contrary, these boys cringe when another says “pissed” or “crap”. These boys apologize for hurting a bug, for breaking a Lego creation, for saying something mean to their parents. They have deeply embedded rules about right and wrong. So, how does a make-shift gun and a threatening phrase sneak past their judgment?

I’m convinced that the answer lies more within the NT world than the ASD world and things get lost in translation. I’ve been asked to verify, “He won’t kill anyone right?” In essence, he says it without intent, right? Talk about a loaded weapon…I mean, question.

At dinner last night, I sat with an old friend and a new acquaintance. I listened to how we described things. “It kills me to think….” “If that doesn’t happen, I’ll have to….” “Shut up!” So, what’s the difference? I think, for now, two things (and I’m sure there are more). The first relates to delivery. We were laughing, joking, sharing, and confiding. Their was no anger, no fear, no suspicion, no concern. We sat in a large restaurant saying these things — just like most middle schools sit in a large cafeteria and say these things — without so much as raising a flag. No one gave us a side-long glance, no one called the manager, no one escorted us out. So, it could lead one to think that if you are joking and happy, these comments become okay. That was my initial thought, and I don’t entirely think it untrue but I think it’s not that simple.

The more important component is one of relationship. A relationship brings history, personal understanding, shared knowledge, and shared experiences. When I hear my friend say, “I’ll kill you if you tell her…” I know that she is not going to pick up her steak knife to stab me, push me down the stairs as we walk about of the restaurant, or try to commit vehicular homicide. As such, I laugh. She laughs. And, the new acquaintance begins to learn, to build a catalogue of how we interact. This catalogue acts as a reference guide letting her know what it “okay” and “not okay” — at their most basic levels. My friend and I have already created this catalogue but we add a new chapter and a new index entry with the new acquaintance. The relationship expands. It does not diminish due to our language. In fact, the language helps it grow.

So, why does this paradoxically simple and complex process fail to happen with Aspies? That is a loaded question that I should erase and revise so as to avoid easy, obvious, needed backlash. Interestingly, though, I would wager most NTs believe that relationships do, in fact, fail for those with ASD. I know better. I’ve seen better. I’ve seen these very boys joke with each other about “killing” and “shutting up” and “bombing” without so much as a blink of an eye, raised blood pressure, red alert. From them or from me. We have that shared history together in which we feel safe, free, and comfortable. Maybe the better question is why does it sometimes succeed, sometimes fail? Maybe it’s an Aspie-NT phenomenon, not an Aspie-Aspie/NT-NT issue. I’d like to think that the chasm between us isn’t so wide, so desolate. As a matter of fact, I know it’s not.

I go ’round and ’round with this issue. Trying to help them push past their impulsivity to utilize a more appropriate phrase, while all the while they hear the echoes of this language in the hallways, the classrooms, the locker rooms, and the lunchrooms. It seems to be simply words with friends…until spoken by an Aspie.

 
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Posted by on September 8, 2011 in NTs on ASD

 

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Namenda and Aricept: Not a Cure for Autism, but a Start

Doctors, parents, and researchers always seem to be looking for “it”: The cure to autism. While science seems to be years away from such a discovery, scientists have tapped into drugs intended to treat Alzheimer’s disease as a possible catalyst for brain activity in individuals with autism. Their out-of-the-box thinking has been rewarded with some positive, though tentative, results.

Dr. Randall Kavalier, a psychiatrist in private practice in West Des Moines, Iowa, prescribes Namenda to children who have autism or who suffer from brain injuries. Namenda, the brand name of memantine, is the first in a class of Alzheimer’s disease medications that blocks NMDA glutamate receptors. Dr. Kavalier states that Namenda clears up the interference among signals to nerves in the brain. Dr. Kavalier said that while elderly brains have long finished developing, children’s brains are still being molded. He said that, in many cases, after children swallow a few pills, “They light up. I mean, they turn on.”

Dr. Kavalier is not the first to experiment with memantine. Last summer, researchers at The Ohio State University’s Nisonger Center also used a drug normally prescribed for Alzheimer’s patients to determine if it will improve the communication skills of children with autism with positive results.

In 2001, Michael Chez, M.D., a child neurologist and assistant professor of neurology at Rush Medical School in Chicago published a study about the positive effects of Aricept (donepezil) on the language production in mild to moderately affected children with autism.

Have you tried this medication? Would you try it?

 
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Posted by on February 4, 2011 in Uncategorized

 

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