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Who Teaches NTs about #Autism? C.H.A.S.E.

Who Teaches NTs about #Autism? C.H.A.S.E.

The news? Autism Speaks? A random website? A friend of a friend?

C.H.A.S.E. can.

Community Help for Autism Spectrum Everywhere (C.H.A.S.E.) is a non-profit, grassroots organization founded by parents of an autistic child. The main initiative of C.H.A.S.E. is to promote autism awareness to neurotypical students and community members through education. This collaborative effort utilizes community partnerships and professional expertise to create unique approaches for autism awareness education.

Currently, autism organizations, medical professionals and the education system focuses on the autistic child and how to help them achieve their maximum potential. They do not take into account the neurotypical person, or student, who must interact daily with their autistic peer. People not on the autism spectrum can experience a wide range of emotions regarding their autistic classmates. From confusion to fear, the neurotypical student may have many questions and concerns.

C.H.A.S.E. assists students, teachers, schools and community organizations by building awareness through education. This type of awareness can help students understand the diversity of autism and reduce negative outcomes such as bullying and seclusion. Through education and building awareness, the autistic child is more easily accepted and the neurotypical student is enriched as well.

C.H.A.S.E. has partnered with an elementary school in Overland Park, Kansas to provide education and supports for classrooms
impacted by the unique needs of students with autism. We envision communities that value the diversity of
individuals with autism. What is our plan? C.H.A.S.E. has asked asked for school families who are willing to be identified as having autism and families willing to receive special advocacy training.

Last year, C.H.A.S.E. helped significantly reduce peer conflicts for one boy, after whom C.H.A.S.E. is named. A school counselor delivered a presentation prepared by C.H.A.S.E. explaining autism to his classmates. Several of these lessons helped develop an understanding of what Chase did and why. But, more importantly, peers learned how to help him.

 
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Posted by on September 28, 2014 in Uncategorized

 

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Aspie Fashion

Originally posted on Patient Anonymous: Just Another Head Case:

I’m willing to bet a lot of Aspies and people on the Spectrum will agree with me.

Or maybe not.  Diva, Fashionista, Spectrumicalista!

Do we care about clothes? Sure, we might find something that looks really cool but it ain’t be off The Runway!

We’ll also wear it for an entire week.  Plus, it’ll be with the other clothes we’ve been wearing for an entire week.

And we’ll always keep putting everything on backwards.

Will WordPress on my mobile FINALLY work?

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Posted by on September 20, 2014 in Uncategorized

 

Why the Autism Community Needs an Ice Bucket Challenge

Every weeknight on my way home, I drive past a blue porch light. As you’re most likely aware, that blue light is a symbol of autism awareness. Mission accomplished: I’m aware. Then, I pull into my driveway, park my car, go to bed, awake the next day and repeat. Oh, there’s that blue light again – I’m aware again. Eventually that blue light joins my overly color-saturated life as a Christmas decoration, an Open sign, a flashing police siren. “Lighting it up blue” fades away.

Ice-cold water, on the other hand, sticks around just a bit longer. When damp clothes dry and chilled bones warm, why not relive that glorious moment. A video clip is no doubt on Facebook or Youtube for others to enjoy, to “like” and “share”, and to create a visual phenomenon so contagious that more elaborate schemes have been created, more embarrassing moments gloriously shared, more friends and family nominated, and more wallets opened.

To the tune of $114 million.

In less than one year.

Congratulations are due to the ALS Foundation. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis is a devastating disease worth funding, attention, and education. Nay-sayers criticize the challenge for many sound reasons, none of which I care to address.

What I care about, what confounds me, and what royally pisses me off is why such a phenomenon has yet to bubble up in the autism community. Sure, we’ve had celebrities with children with ASD and television shows depicting the spectrum. They’ve put a face to the cause. They’ve funded the cause. They’ve spread awareness. But, that’s them. Not all of us. Not your next-door neighbor dumping water on his son. Not your daughter’s teacher who nominates her class and parents. Not your child dumping water on you.

The ALS Ice Bucket Challenge brought ALS into our homes and our lives. Sure, donations seemed secondary to “fun” but $114 million talks.

Autism speaks, too, right?

 
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Posted by on September 20, 2014 in Uncategorized

 

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Parenting an Aspie: A Cerebral Task

What if I were to tell you that parenting a child with Asperger’s Disorder is (as not-so-simple as) having an argument without emotion? Perspective and patience, neither of which are plentiful for Aspies or for participants in an argument, are the keys to success.

Let’s face it. An argument takes on a life of its own. It is a verbal joust without rules, order, or logic. At their worst, arguments can be about “winning”, putting others down, and getting revenge. At their best, negative emotion fuels negative emotion as the initial trigger for the argument is shoved aside by anger, frustration, and impatience.

What happens when you replace the word argument with debate? The emotionality of the interaction is completely drained and replaced with rules and structure. A podium allows for uninterrupted speech. A topic is provided beforehand, affording each side time to construct their thoughts into cogent arguments and counterarguments. Emotion is for emphasis but is not necessarily effective or desired.

Let’s take a mom and an Aspie. Our Aspie has failed to brush her teeth after four reminders because the latest installment of Pokemon is far more interesting. Our mom has a long day ahead of her and little sleep and just needs our Aspie to brush her teeth, so they can leave for school.

Brush your teeth.

BRUSH your teeth.

BRUSH YOUR teeth.

BRUSH YOUR TEETH.

When this shift occurs, from problem-solving, from logical, practical thinking, to emotionally laden speech, we lose our Aspie. We bombard her/him with tone of voice, facial expressions, postures, emotive language, and gestures that simply

Shut

An

Aspie

Down.

Brushing anything is farthest from our Aspie’s mind as she tries to make sense of the emotion. Her mind whizzes, she panics, and she has no idea what to do. As she tries to make sense of the emotion, her mom continues to expect that task to be completed. A full-on argument ensues, and our Aspie’s ability to problem-solve, to think rationally – a typical cognitive strength for Aspies – is replaced with a Flight or Flight reaction (depending on the day).

When the dust settles, and the teeth are brushed, our Aspie cannot be left to pick up the pieces, attempting to understand both the problem and the emotion. We need to have a conversation with her, asking her: How can we avoid this next time? How can I communicate better?

Parenting an Aspie is a cerebral task, a constant one at that. By no means am I saying you can parent a neurotypical child easily or mindlessly but they can make sense and learn from your emotions. Your Aspie cannot. You will parent an NT with your gut and an Aspie with your brain. Your Aspie needs you calm, logical, and with your emotions in check.

 

 
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Posted by on February 3, 2012 in ASD in the Grand Scheme

 

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An Obit: Asperger’s Disorder (1994-2013)

An Obit: Asperger’s Disorder (1994-2013)

Asperger’s Disorder, a lovable, socially awkward and at times misunderstood part of the autism spectrum, died in May 2013 due to complications related to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition. Asperger’s endured a prolonged battle with ivory-tower hypocrisy and finally succumbed to the paranoid fears of misdiagnosis-motivated endemics and the resultant raging cost of medical expenses. Asperger’s Disorder, known by aliases Asperger Syndrome or Asperger’s, was 19.

Asperger’s Disorder was surrounded by his family, including his brother, Autistic Disorder. 

A beloved icon to some and a controversial figure to others, Asperger’s had deep roots in the most powerful, creative and brilliant minds of our society. With spots in many popular television shows, Asperger’s became the official poster-child for the autism spectrum family.

From 1994 to 2013, Asperger’s was alleged to be responsible for spearheading a dramatic increase in autism spectrum disorders. While naysayers argued that Asperger’s was PC for “freak” or a bail-out for the “weirdo quirky” ones, Aspies clung to their diagnosis with pride and conviction.

Asperger’s is survived by Autistic Disorder, Autism Spectrum Disorder, Sensory Integration Disorder, Childhood Disintegrative Disorder, and Temper Dysregulation Disorder. Asperger’s had recently celebrated graduation from high school and was pursuing courses at the local community college while living at home. Although he aspired to attend the local major university, he knew had many adaptive skills to gain, including juggling a part-time job and maintaining his personal hygiene.

Memorials will be held at upcoming Star Wars conventions, technology summits, E3, LegoLand, Comic Con, LARP gatherings at local colleges, and Magic, YuGiOh, and Pokemon gaming rooms in coffee shops.

 
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Posted by on January 30, 2012 in ASD in the Grand Scheme

 

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Not So Fast: I’d Like to Keep Asperger’s

I have fallen off the face of the blogging Earth for the last I don’t even know how long. I’ve had messages about my health and vitality, as though my silence has suggested that I have disconnected from breathing or working with individuals with ASD. Far from the truth. From the past six months I have been too busy to write anything beyond immediate, work-related items. That’s a nice way of saying I’ve been tired, and, if you’ve read my blog with any regularity, you know that I like to write when passionate, which is usually not when tired.

Over the past three months, I have had a recurring question, theme, concern presented to me: The changes in the DSM-IV-TR that will remove the diagnosis of Asperger’s Disorder in favor of a broader term, yet more diagnostically restrictive diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder. I have written on this topic long, long, long ago. So, why do I return to this topic? Well, to be honest, because about 75% of my clients have Asperger’s Disorder. And, this question KEEPS PLAGUING ME: What does this mean for my child?

I hate my answer.

I don’t know.

Sure, I could hypothesize.

But, will IDEA catch up? I don’t know. I doubt it. It was “just” reauthorized in 2006. In cyberworld, that’s centuries ago. In the legal world, that’s yesterday. For parents with kids with ASD, it’s forever.

Will insurance companies finally do something? Sometime before I die, perhaps. Might be quicker than the reauthorization of IDEA. Maybe someone should take me out. Just trying to expedite things.

If the hope is to stem the tide of increasing diagnostic numbers, not sure it will work. If the hope is to further complicate and bifurcate the ASD community, its focus, treatment, understanding, clarity, awareness, acceptance…. oh, I’m sorry, I have a point…. then, MISSION ACCOMPLISHED.

Yes, the criteria need revamping. We just “borrowed” from Autistic Disorder to explain Asperger’s. Not the smartest idea, but the diagnoses did get rolling.

But, we fought for Asperger’s and now we are going to kill it after 18 years? I’ve had pants, pets, and pairs of scissors longer than that. And, why are we killing it? It’s imperfect, but Hans Asperger had identified something different than Autistic Disorder. Autism is NOT Asperger’s. Yes, they are on the same spectrum, but they are not the same.

If you want my opinion, and I know you don’t, we would replace PDD-NOS with autism spectrum disorder, keep and revamp Asperger’s Disorder, and refine Autistic Disorder.

The APA didn’t ask me. though. Or any of my parents or clients about the loss of Asperger’s. It’s like ripping a bandaid off scraping the surface with sandpaper.

 
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Posted by on January 29, 2012 in ASD in the Grand Scheme

 

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Asperger’s: The Original Auto-Correct (That’s More Accurate than the iPhone)

You know how your iPhone has an auto-correct button, and sometimes it works and sometimes it fails miserably? (Mind you, I don’t really know this. I have a very unsophisticated mobile.) Well, oddly, that is exactly the experience of an Aspie.  Aspies notice many things an NTs brain seamlessly autocorrects, without ever reaching a level of consciousness or concern. But, they don’t just notice, they are impacted by these seemingly smaller differences that, in their mind, appears zeppelin-like. Take Cody, for instance, it’s not uncommon for him to start 99.9% of his sentences with, “Well, actually….” or “You mean….” or “That’s wrong….” or some other permutation of “You” + “Incorrect” + Grammar/Fact/Punctuation. These are the good moments, really, because there are times when he is stuck in thought, unable to think, act, move due to the processing of some inconsistency in his brain. Cody and I have spent countless hours developing ways for him to: 1. Not make these comments, or 2. Offer these comments more appropriately. We have spent more time, though, discussing impact — why these comments negatively impact his conversational partner despite his intentions to be helpful. Helpful. It is not uncommon for Cody to offer, “I wouldn’t want them to think that. If they did, they could get it wrong on the test. Or, they could share it with someone else who could believe them.” Auto-corrections to divert catastrophic outcomes.

There is an automatic response, a guttural reaction to his corrections — a sense of rudeness at best, egocentricism and narcissism at worst but more typically. Really, these are all synonyms for the omnipresent deficit of perspective-taking, the ability to understand the ways in which our thoughts and actions impact the thoughts and feelings of others. So, there is it, right — remedy the perspective-taking, build the alternative skills, watch the correcting reduce, and the misunderstandings fade away. If you read my blog with any regularity, you have a hunch I dislike and distrust this conclusion.

If we really understand and respect the rationale for the hyper-correctness — beyond the literalism, the rule-following — we see that there is an on-going search for meaning. Inconsistencies alter the very fabric of what a situation, statement, interaction mean. NTs look for inconsistencies to place a judgment, to push that inconsistency back into the hole where it belongs, to belittle it, to ostracize it, to make it change. (Mind you, not every NT is as pejorative as this portrayal.) Aspies are different. They look for differences to learn, to assimilate, to expand their understanding of a situation. There is an inherent irony that they often utter their sightings, usually for further clarification, only to turn the focus on them. NTs quietly stare, ruminate, and escape the label of impropriety. But our thoughts, our reasons for spotting the differences we see are far less altruistic than the Aspie who seeks not to judge, but to learn.

 
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Posted by on September 30, 2011 in Uncategorized

 
 
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